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Creamy Roasted Poblano & Sweet Corn Chowder

My garden is ready to be prepped for winter, but the poblano peppers are still going strong! And so are a few of my green zebra tomatoes—they all want me to wait a little bit longer.

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Last week I was able to bring in quite the bowlful of these poblano beauties, and my brain instantly went to soup. And with the cooler evening temps, how about a comforting, creamy one? Yes.

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It’s the beginning of manuscript editing for YU Book #2, and this soup will be a great go-to all week long.

Print Recipe
Creamy Roasted Poblano, Cauliflower & Corn Chowder
A comforting, creamy, dairy-free poblano pepper, cauliflower, and corn chowder that everyone will love.
Recipe ©: YumUniverse
Author: Heather Crosby
Recipe type: Soup
Allergy Info: Gluten-Free, Dairy-Free, Plant-Based, Vegan
Serves: 4–6
Prep Time 10
Cook Time 20
Servings
Ingredients
  • 6 large poblano green peppers (for about 1½ cups roasted, peeled, chopped)
  • 2 tbsp unrefined coconut oil, avocado oil, or grapeseed oil
  • 1 large white onion, diced
  • 2 ribs celery, de-stringed and diced
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • cups cauliflower florets, chopped
  • 3 cups non-GMO corn kernels
  • tsp ground cumin
  • ½ tsp smoked paprika (optional)
  • i/4 loosely-packed cup fresh cilantro, plus more for garnish
  • ¼–½ tsp Black pepper to taste
  • Pinch or three of ground cayenne
  • low-sodium veggie stock (try making your own)*
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 cup coconut milk) (canned, full fat
  • 1 tsp fine-ground sea salt, plus more to taste if needed
Prep Time 10
Cook Time 20
Servings
Ingredients
  • 6 large poblano green peppers (for about 1½ cups roasted, peeled, chopped)
  • 2 tbsp unrefined coconut oil, avocado oil, or grapeseed oil
  • 1 large white onion, diced
  • 2 ribs celery, de-stringed and diced
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • cups cauliflower florets, chopped
  • 3 cups non-GMO corn kernels
  • tsp ground cumin
  • ½ tsp smoked paprika (optional)
  • i/4 loosely-packed cup fresh cilantro, plus more for garnish
  • ¼–½ tsp Black pepper to taste
  • Pinch or three of ground cayenne
  • low-sodium veggie stock (try making your own)*
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 cup coconut milk) (canned, full fat
  • 1 tsp fine-ground sea salt, plus more to taste if needed
Instructions
  1. You want to roast the peppers whole one of two ways—either directly on a low gas flame (5–10 minutes) ... or under the broiler (7–15 minutes)—rotating as they roast so all sides blacken. Toss them in a bowl and cover with a dish towel so they steam for about 10 minutes.
  2. Then, peel off the waxy skins and the char (use a paring knife to help scrape if needed), slice in half, remove ribs, seeds, and stems—then chop. Set aside.
  3. Into a Dutch oven or large soup pot add oil, celery, and onion.
  4. Cook together over medium heat for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  5. Add cauliflower florets and cook together another 3 minutes. Then add garlic...
  6. ... and corn kernels and cook together another 3 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  7. Stir in cumin, paprika, cilantro, and black pepper—stir together 1 minute.
  8. Then, add veggie stock and bay leaf. Bring to a boil, then simmer together for 5 minutes.
  9. Stir in the coconut milk, salt, and peppers. Then squeeze in the juice from half a lime and season with more salt and pepper to taste.
Recipe Notes

* Learn how to make your own vegetable stock here.

For a thicker chowder, transfer 1 cup of soup to the blender (make sure you leave the bay leaf out!) and purée until smooth—add back into the chowder for volume.

This soup is also delicious with roasted mushrooms and cooked buckwheat or brown rice.

Also very tasty with 9–10 roasted and quartered baby potatoes stirred in.

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  1. Angelica

    Sounds lovely! Do the peppers add chili heat? I’d love to try it but trying to figure out if my kids (7 & 3 yo) would help me eat it – they don’t enjoy heat. Thanks!

    • It depends on the peppers—some harvests can have some kick, but most are mild. Remove the seeds for sure and to be on the super safe side, try the recipe with red, yellow, or orange bell peppers instead of poblanos 😉 Or roast up a poblano for you, and bell peppers for the kiddos—simply stir in the peppers when serving. Let us know how that works! x

  2. My last of the summer poblanos were super hot so after some research I added a bit more “dairy” coconut yogurt, the other half of the lime, a splash of agave and a large spoonful of tahini. This all dropped the heat considerably and didn’t effect the wonderful flavor at all. Just waiting for the hubs to come home so we can share a warm yummy bowl by the fire! Thanks for all your hard work and sharing.

    • That sounds wonderful, Lauri! I’m so happy you gave this recipe a try 🙂 x

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