8 comments

Shiitake Mushroom, Buckwheat & Quinoa Stir Fry

This is one of those recipes that may seem like a production, but after you prepare it once, you will see that it’s pretty easy. And very adaptable. With a tasty sauce like this one, you can stir fry any combination of gluten-free supergrains and veggies and have success. 

Print this recipe: Shiitake Mushroom, Buckwheat & Quinoa Stir Fry

Serves 4

Tools:
Wok or large skillet
Chef’s knife
2 pots with lids
Medium glass bowl
Silicone spatula

Ingredients:
Try to buy everything organic. Here’s why.
Sauce
Juice from 1 lime
2 tbsp coconut aminos
2 tbsp gluten-free, vegan teriyaki sauce
1 tsp rice wine vinegar
1 tbsp sucanat
1/4 tsp sriracha sauce
1/2 tsp fine ground sea salt
Juice from 1/2 navel orange

Stir Fry
1 1/2 cups soaked and cooked quinoa (here’s how)
1 1/2 cups soaked and cooked buckwheat (here’s how)
1-2 cups shiitake mushrooms, sliced (use as many as you like)
1/2 cup cashews, chopped
1 red onion, diced
1 large carrot, diced
1 cup sugar snap peas, sliced into 1/2″ pieces
6 green onions, sliced thinly
1 tbsp fresh minced ginger root
2 cloves garlic, minced
3 tbsp chopped cilantro leaves
1 tbsp + 2 tsp unrefined coconut oil

Let’s get started.
If you haven’t yet, cook your soaked and rinsed quinoa and buckwheat.

Squeeze fresh lime and orange juice into a medium bowl. Add remaining sauce ingredients and stir well. Set aside.

Prepare all of your veggies, chop your cilantro and…

… mince your ginger root.

In a skillet (or wok if you have one) heated to medium-high, cook red onion and carrots with 1 tbsp coconut oil for 7 minutes. Stir often.

Now, increase heat of skillet to high, add mushrooms and 2 tsp coconut oil. Stir for one minute.

Add ginger, garlic, half of your green onions and stir-fry for about 30 seconds. Add buckwheat and quinoa and stir-fry for about 1 minute. Fold in snap peas and stir-fry for one minute.

Add sauce and fold together for 1 minute.

Serve immediately topped with chopped cashews, remaining green onions and cilantro.

Enjoy!

Fun Food Facts:
Buckwheat contains eight essential amino acids, including tryptophan, which helps elevate mood and mental clarity (happyhappy). Quinoa is about 20 percent protein, considered a good source of lysine, potassium and iron and its B vitamins are also partly responsible for the conversion of carbohydrate into energy (workout fuel anyone?). Unlike wheat or rice, quinoa contains a balanced set of essential amino acids for us humans, making it a complete protein source. Quinoa is gluten-free (yay) and easy to digest. Ginger fires up digestion (helping nutrients assimilate) and is a terrific warming food for cold months.

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  1. Beverly

    When the recipes say -I cup buckwheat groats soaked- is that one cup after soaking, or one cup before soaking? Does this rule apply to all of your recipes?

    • Heather Crosby

      Great question Beverly. “One cup buckwheat groats, soaked” is one cup of dry groats soaked in water which will yield more than one cup in the end. When I say, “One cup cooked buckwheat” that means one cup of already cooked grains. This rule does apply to all recipes. Hope that helps.

  2. Isaac

    Your site is excellent however I c an’t find the nutritional information for your recipes. Is there any way I can get this info? Without it, I am afraid to move forward with your delicious meals

    • Heather Crosby

      Hi there Isaac~
      You can read about my thoughts re:nutritional information/labels here. At this time, I don’t provide them because I focus more on eating a variety of nutrient dense foods, including beneficial, plant-based fats. I know that there are calculators online that you could use for my recipes—just ask the Google. Good luck, thanks for stopping by and for your kind feedback! Hope you try some recipes.

  3. Nancy Steinman

    Heather….what if you already have toasted buckwheat groats? Do you soak them and toast them again? I have both kinds and always get confused. I thought when the term buckwheat groats was used they were referring to the toasted buckwheat and when they say buckwheat they are referring to raw. (Whoever they is) :)

    • Heather Crosby

      Toasting or roasting buckwheat groats (and this goes for other seeds, grains and nuts) releases about 40-50% of the phytic acids, which is why we soak—to make the nutrients in these foods easy to assimilate. But if you want optimal nutrient benefit, soak them every time, whether they are toasted or raw. When in doubt, soak ;)

  4. Rosanna

    Thank you Heather for this great recipe.. I had never tried buckwheat before and it was a different experience I have to say!… I changed a little bit your recipe and substituted cashews with sliced almonds and mushrooms with asparagus! Only used the teriyaki sauce and lime and will say that it turned out AWESOME!!! I guess that the beauty of recipes is to make it them our own too! BTW, I just registered to participate in your 30-day challenge! Woohoo!

    • Heather Crosby

      High fives all around, Rosanna!

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