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Raw Raspberry Fruit Leather

When I was a kid, I couldn’t get enough of Fruit Roll-Ups. Chewy, colorful food that you could play with—magical stuff. Plus, mom felt good because she thought she was giving me a serving of fruit. Sadly, as many of you know, most foodstuffs out there on the shelves, especially those being marketed to families as “natural and healthy,” are full of processed sugars, preservatives and additives.

I am here to tell you that you can make delicious, wholesome fruit leather with only two ingredients. Shoot, you can make it with only one if you like—just the fruit. What a fruit leather should be made of.

I am a big believer that as adults, we should still be able to enjoy the same things that filled us with joy as children. You know you loved fruit leathers too—bring that fun back!

Makes: 2 large sheets of leather, you can cut down to the sizes you like to get about 2 dozen single servings.
Preparation Time: 8 hours

Tools:
Blender
Dehydrator (optional)
Oven instructions at bottom of post

Try to buy everything organic. Here’s why.
1 8oz package of raspberries (or any fruit you like)
1 tbsp raw, wild-harvested honey (sub maple syrup, sucanat or brown rice syrup)

Let’s Get Started:
Rinse your raspberries well.

Place them in the blender with the honey and blend until smooth. Want a fancy adult version of these nostalgic treats? Add a tbsp of Chambord Liqueur to your blender mix before dehydrating.

Pour some mixture on a Teflex sheet. Using a flexible kitchen spatula or butter knife, spread the pureed raspberries in a square shape about 1/2″ short of the edges of your Teflex. Be sure that the mixture is about 1/8″ thick, or evenly distributed enough that you cannot see any Teflex underneath, just vibrant red and raspberry seeds. You should fill two trays. Once your squares are formed, place them in the dehydrator set to a temperature of 95-100°F for about 8 hours. When the leather is dry, but slightly sticky to the touch, it is ready.

You want to be able to peel the leather off of the Teflex with relative ease. Test it, by peeling up a corner. If it comes up easily, and the center of your leather square is dry (but slightly sticky) to the touch, you are ready to start peeling the entire square off the Teflex.

But wait!

You first want to cut out two squares of parchment paper to match the size of the Teflex sheets. You are going to transfer your leather to the parchment.

Now, you can just spread your raspberry mix on parchment instead of the Teflex for dehydrating, and once dry, cut that up directly into strips—eliminating the whole transferring step. But dehydrating the puree on the parchment makes it wrinkle, and the designer in me likes the look of flat strips of leather. Both preparations taste exactly the same though—deeelicious. So it’s up to you.

Back to the transfer.

Make sure your parchment is laying flat right next to you. Gently and slowly, peel up the edges of your fruit leather until entirely off of the Teflex and lay on the parchment. The side of the leather that was facing up on your Teflex, should be the side facing up on the parchment. Carefully press down so the leather sticks to the parchment.

Now, using kitchen scissors, cut the leather and parchment into strips about 3-4″ wide. Then cut those strips in half so you end up with approximately 7″ strips. Then roll ’em on up. Secure with a cute piece of string (I like the look of hemp twine with the parchment) or just lay the rolls next to eachother in an airtight glass jar.

If you don’t eat them all first, they can last for 4-6 weeks in an airtight jar on the counter, in the pantry or in the fridge.

These are a great snack to make for traveling too.

Enjoy!

No dehydrator?
Just spread out your puree onto a Silpat Silicone Baking Liner (works best) or unbleached parchment paper. Heat an oven set to the lowest temp possible for 6-8 hours—until the center is dry (not crisp) and slightly tacky. Peel up and place on unbleached parchment sheet and cut and roll how you like.

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  1. Melissa Bortz

    I cannot wait to make these (and a bunch of other recipes on your site) in September when I get my food dehydrator for my birthday! I am sooo excited!

  2. Hilary

    This looks so yummy, but I don’t have a dehydrator – can I just cook it or something on low heat?

    • Hilary~
      You can try drying it at a low temp (200°F) in the oven on parchment paper…it may be crispy versus chewy, but I bet just as delicious. Let us know if it works!

  3. Chantel

    Hello Heather, I bought a dehydrator the very one you recommend, the first recipe I wanted to try was this fruit leather. Help!!! It did not turn out! I tried other fruits as well, strawberries, cherries, I can’t get the fruit off of the sheet, let alone try transferring to parchment. I used the premium paraflexx sheets (silicone). Now the first time I know I didn’t make the layer thick enough, but after that I don’t know. Any more tips? Thanks, Chantel

    • Hi Chantel~
      I sure wish I was in the kitchen with you for this one. You know first hand, having been at the big launch party, that I made 1000s of fruit leathers for guests and I have to say that fruit leathers were the easiest treat I made. I use Teflex sheets for drying and honey (moisture is nice) in my fruit leather, but have successfully made it without honey too. Can you tell me specifically what is happening when you try to peel it off? Paraflexx and Teflex are slick, non-porous surfaces, so I’m stumped. When I even look up the two sheets online, there are photos of people peeling fruit leather off of them. Are you using organic fruit? Let’s figure this out!

  4. Thanks Heather. The edges are quite crispy and the center is just just stuck on the sheet. I will email you a couple pics I took. The first two times I used organic fruit, then the last two I didn’t for fear of wasting more good fruit! The last time I used another persons recipe for thawed bagged frozen fruit, same results on all. One recipe I used honey, and the rest agave.

    • Chantel, I am completely perplexed. I have made countless fruit leathers with no problems. The only thing I can think of is your drying temp. What do you have it set at?

  5. Annika

    How long do these keep for?

    • Heather Crosby

      Weeks and weeks (even months) if kept in a cool, dark place, or the fridge—all the water has been removed, and that is what promotes decomposition ;)

  6. Annika

    @Chantel – Was your pureed fruit evenly spread out? My thought is that perhaps the edges were spread more thinly, causing the edges to dry faster than the thicker center.

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